udev and cloning a linux vm: Network not working…

Have you ever stumbled upon a cloned Linux system, in my case CentOS 6.5, where eth0 does not exist and eth1 isn’t started automatically?

When VMware clones a VM it gives its network card a new MAC address, ensuring that you don’t end up with several VMs with the same MAC. If your distro uses udev and it discoveres the new NIC, it gives it a different UUID, thus creating eth1 in the process, since it can’t match the MAC addresses and UUIDs of the NICs. This might break all sorts of scripts or configs.

Here is how to fix it:

  • First we need to remove the discovered and assigned UUIDs from udev:

rm -f /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules

  • Secondly we need to edit the networking script for eth0:

vi /etc/sysconfig/networking/devices/ifcfg-eth0

Here you should change the old MAC address to the new one the VM got after cloning.

  • Reboot.

Thats it. eth0 should work as it used to on the parent VM.

 

thanks to William: http://www.envision-systems.com.au/blog/2012/09/21/fix-eth0-network-interface-when-cloning-redhat-centos-or-scientific-virtual-machines-using-oracle-virtualbox-or-vmware/

vSphere 5.5 and ESXi 5.5

Hi all,

today I am not writing because of a certain problem or thing I stumbled upon. The “news” I want to share is somewhat “old” (26 August 2013), too: VMware announced vSphere 5.5 and ESXi 5.5!

Why am I posting this? Besides some cool new features in Hardware Version 10 or on the VDP side and Hypervisor side, a mayor change that will affect how we use vCenter in our Company is: Full Mac OS X Client integration (including the plugin for vCenter WebClient).

Now, if that isn’t great news? 😉

Here’s a short sheet about whats new: http://blogs.vmware.com/vsphere/files/2013/09/vSphere-5.5-Quick-Reference-0.5.pdf

And heres the long story: http://www.vmware.com/files/pdf/vsphere/VMware-vSphere-Platform-Whats-New.pdf

All the best,

maybeageek

HowTo: Use/Migrate an existing local OS X user profile for use with an ActiveDirectory User

So, we’ve all been there: A user is using his Mac with a local account. At some point IT needs to manage all Computers and Passwords, and thus this Mac together with it’s user needs to be ActiveDirectory managed. But of course: No setting, no file, nothing should change, because the user is king (and maybe the company’s boss that hates being upset, and even a changed background or shortcut-location upsets him….). Here’s how to do it:

  • Create a new local user with admin rights.
  • Logout of existing User and into the new admin user.
  • Delete the user you want to migrate. When the system asks, don’t delete or archive the user folder, just leave it where it is.
  • In a terminal issue the following command “sudo mv /Users/oldusername /Users/newusername” where newusername is the shortname of the AD User. This is critical!
  • If not already happened bind the Mac to the AD.
  • Use “chown” in terminal to change the owner of the users directory to the new domain user. Use the shortname, no need to write the FQDN of the AD.
  • Use “directory utility” to change the settings and check the box to create a “mobile account at login”, and check the second box, too.
  • Now logout, maybe reboot. (Sometimes it is needed, sometimes not, depending on how quickly the Mac gets the new AD binding.
  • Login using the new users shortname. It should ask for a mobile profile, create one!
  • You might need to update the keychain password.

Thats it: Enjoy your migrated user folder and settings. You shouldn’t notice any difference besides a new password 😉

One note: The new user is a standard user without administrative rights. If you need to give him/her or the Administrator-Group admin rights, you can to this in the “Directory Utility” as well. Single users won’t work, use groups like this: DOMAINNAME\groupname .

All the best.

vSphere/VMware: failed to connect virtual device ethernet0

failed to connect virtual device ethernet0

That message said hello for every single VM after there was a major breakdown in a data center. The breakdown was seen as a welcome opportunity to upgrade everything from 4.1 to 5.1. And since everything was broken anyway (although the VMs continued to run, yeah VMware ;-)) no one bothered going the proper path but just evacuated some ESXi-Hosts, re-installed them with 5.1, created a new vCenter and tried to import the VMs.

What was happening?

The GUI gave no hint as to what was wrong. But in the ESXi host logfiles something gave away what was going on: “vShield filters cannot be found for ethernet0”. Now, that is a clue, indeed!

The old 4.1 was running with everything filtered through vShield, whereas it was decided to not use vShield in this setup for 5.1 anymore. But in every single vmx-file for every VM there had to be removed the following two lines in order for everything to work as it should:

ethernet0.filter0.param1 = “uuid=5006f477-a2df-b018-b331-b2b61f1b95f9.000”
ethernet0.filter0.name = “vshield-dvfilter-module”

So, people, beware of vShield when moving VMs from one cluster to another.

All the best,

Thomas